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20121101
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Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)
of the country. wh more than $350 million spent on ballot measures in california alone. and voter registration in the state has hit an all-time high with 18 million now on the rolls. who are the now vots vnd what are their interests and concerns? plus, a million giant fan faithf faithfuls hit the streets to celebrate their world series sweep. coming up next. >>> hello, i'm belva davis and welcome to "this week in northern california." joining me on the news panel tonight, josh richman, regional political reporter for the bay area news group. carla marin you've cci, "san franciscochronicle." and odette keeley, new america media anchor and executive producer. and in sacramento, john myers, kxtv news 10, political editor. well, this campaign season has been marked by massive amounts of spending from outside groups, yet, with all of the money spent and all of the people who paid attention, the race for president remains too close to call. and here in california, we're feeling the affects of an anslaught of political ads for and boll lot melot measures. john, you were reporting on an $11 millionl p
? a new approach to ridding california of air pollution, it's called cap and trade and it's under legal attack. an assessment of how it work or it doesn't. techies say the election was won or lost in the digital realm. but not everyone agrees. and an in-depth look at the fight over public nudity in san francisco. coming up next. >>> good evening. i'm spencer michaels. welcome to this week in northern california. joining me tonight, marisa lagos, san francisco chronicle, city hall reporter. hari sreenivasan, senior correspondent for the pbs news hour. lauren sommer, science and environment reporter. and josh richman, bay area news group political reporter. josh, let's start with you. all of a sudden it seems like california, which was in the depths, is now rolling in money. and there's more taxes, we've passed proposition 30. i can't believe there's that much of a turn-around. is there? >> well, there is a turn-around. i wouldn't say we're rolling in money. i've never seen a state so happy to a $1.9 billion deficit over the next year and a half. that's basically where we're at. now, you
it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically she control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters srprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in aw kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker beor as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington, nevada,
, they're voting on medical marijua tomorrow. woodruff: we also want to bring up quickly california where there are a number of issues on the ballot. having to do withha taxes. and a number of other topics. >> california is really ground zero for the initiative process. they tend to have more initiatives than any other state. they have 11 this year including two competing meases that would increase taxes in different ways to fund education and help balance the stateat budget. >> woodruff: we also know that health care is the ballot. remind us where and what that would mean if those wue to pass. >> sure. there are five states that have votes on the affordable care act this year. in missouri, it's bill that would prohibit the state from setting up a health insurance exchange. in the other four states it's a broader measure that attempts to block really implementation of the affordable care act. it ts up the right to have private insurance as a constitutional right in the state and prohibits the state from requiring anybody to buyts insurance or penalizing anybody for failing to buy insuran
. the pack 8, which is now the pack 12, was surprisingly enough four schools in california, two in oregon and two in washington. so geography was important, academics were important and competitive levels were important. now the landscape has changed completely. geography has been thrown out completely. academics have been thrown out completely and, to some degree, competitive levels have been thrown out completely because it's all about what schools can make you the most t.v. dollars and a conference and what conferences can make schools the most t.v. dollars. that's the unifying force now. >> brown: so it's dollars and television. particularly in football, right? >> exactly. a all of those thing changes that have happened over a period of ten years now, because it began when the a.c.c. raided the big east for virginia tech, miami and boston college to improve itself as a football conference to get more t.v. dollars for football. it is about football because basketball actually5/h2y at most schools nets more dollars because the cost is less. but the potential in football because of telev
fire in california. shares fell 2.8%closing atg their lowest price since july. two bright spots for chevron were its smaller refineries processing cheaper oil from montana and north dakota. meantime, chesapeake energy fell to a three month low, down 7.9%. the company has been trying to reduce its massive debt load. today the company said it may delay cutting its i.o.u.'s into 2013. the prospect of the delay was met with selling. you may have missed it but the ipad mini went on sale today. apple's newest product didn't have the usual hoopla. still, analyst expect apple to sell one million or more of the devices during its first weekend on the market. apple stock continued its sell- off at began in the days after its iphone five announcement in september. today, shares fell 3.3%. they are down 18 percent from their all-time high in six weeks ago. solar stocks were not shiningat for the technology industry today. first solar dropped 8.9%. it cut its full year revenue forecast blaming disruptions in its supply chain thanks to hurricane sandy. sun-power fell 7.9% even though it had a
facilities in california. boeing hopes to cut costs by more than $1.5 billion over the next two years. >> susie: boeing shares got caught up in the market downdraft, tom, falling 2%, and it had plenty of company. all 30 of the dow components were in the red today. >> there was a lot of red on the screen this post-election day. in europe, and also earnings, all getting mixed in here. let's get under way with tonight's market focus. >> tom: stocks dropped right from the opening bell today as investor focus shifted beyond election day. the s&p 500 opened down, and fell to its lowest price of the session just before noon eastern time. the pressure was steady throughout the afternoon hours, with the index finishing lower by 2.4%. today's drop in s&p 500 is its sharpest sell-off in four and a half months. it takes the index down to a level last seen in august. trading volume was heavier. 875 million shares on the big board. just over two billion traded on the nasdaq. leading the sell-off, the financial sector falling 3.5%, the energy sector dropped 3.1%, and technology was under pressure ag
business the jolt it needs. >> reporter: the chevrolet spark e.v. will hit showrooms in california and oregon next summer. engineers are still testing the pure plug-in so general motors can't say yet how many miles the sub-compact will get on a single charge. what it can say is new technology will allow for faster charging. the spark won't be cheap. with tax incentives, the car's sticker price will be about $25,000, double the price of the gas-powered version. >> when you look at the functionality that this vehicle has and the range we offer-- which we believe is the top of its segment-- it is going to be extremely competitive from a price perspective. you're always going to pay more for an electric vehicle than you would for a traditional vehicle with a gas engine. >> reporter: general motors has placed a huge bet on electric vehicles, hoping they'll help the company reach the government's 50-mile per gallon corporate average fuel economy requirement in 2025. but so far, interest in e.v.s has been lukewarm. g.m. launched the electric hybrid volt nearly two years ago, but so far th
communities and fewer lives that way. >> california just took steps to weaken their three strikes and you're out policy. that's a step in the right direction. >> and you also have folks on both sides of the political aisle who are making progress on that. >> but in terms of washington politics it looks to me as if all the blood, sweat and tears of this campaign, all those billions of dollars ended up with the status quo. the republican leadership in washington said the day after the election, "no new revenue, no new taxes." and many conservative activists are not yielding an inch despite the election results. let me play for you an excerpt from a video that was put out by one of the leading conservative activists at the heritage foundation which is sort of the granddaddy of conservative think tanks. >> president obama's re-election is a devastating blow. but it's not a decisive defeat. we are in a war. we're in a war to save this nation. and abandoning our post will condemn it to a future of managed decline. to win this war we must remain committed to fighting president obama's agenda. we
of these maps, they shed california as an island and it took a long time for that toy actually get removed from the maps-- old maps, it often took 100 years, maybe 200 years. >> reporter: google and others can react more quickly because of all the input they get. usands of times a day, people all over the world tell google, via the internet, that roads, or signage, or stores or parks have changed, or that a their own neighborhood is poorly represented and that the company needs to update its maps.v erro iestigatethe allec2 , and tries to correct them. the concept of having people on the ground change the map is rsalled crowd sourcing. and it's the principle pioneered by an israeli-based mapping company called waze. that firm, with a small palo alto office, uses g.p.s. to track the location of 27 million drivers who have downloaded its app. waze depends on that crowd to update its maps, determine traffic congestion and direct users to alternate routes. >> so while you're getting a free navigation service, you're also contributing to the community. >> reporter: waze vice president di-ann eisnor s
examines propositions and congressional races on the ballot in california. and older americans are working longer and returning to the workforce rcter retiring.ti you can help paul solman look into that demographic shift. if you're an older worker, fill out a questionnare on the rundown. all that and more is on our website newshour.pbs.org. jeff? >> brown: and again, to our honor roll of american service personnel killed in the afghanistan conflict. we add them as their deaths are made official and photographs become available. here,n silence, are eightnc more. >> brown: and that's the "newshour" for tonight. i'm jeffrey brown. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. we'll see you online and agn here tomorrow evening with mark shields and david brooks among a others. nigh gyoud ndoot. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by:ni and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. captioning sponsored by macnei
at a university inli oakland, california, seven dead at a sikh temple in oak creek, wisconsin. 12 killed and dozens more wound at a move yee these per in aurora, colorado. and then there was this. >> i pledge allegiance to the flag of the united states of america and to the -- >> congresswmann gabby giffords leading the democratic national convention in the edge of allegiance some 20 months after she was shot in the head in arizona. >> with liberty and justiceed for all. (cheers and applause) >> there was one brief exchange during the second debate about gun violence. >> i also share your belief that weapons that were designed for soldiers in war theatres don't belong on our streets. >> i'm not el favor of new pieces of legislation on guns and f taking guns away or making certain guns illegal. a >> reporter: but during debatesurs of deted t domestic matters the phrase "gun control" was never mentioned,guot even by the democratic incumbent. >> you'll find the rest ofot that segment >> brown: you'll find the rest of that segment and much more on pecial, election "what's at stake," airing t
in economic policy. >> sreenivasan: the state of california held its first auction today of greenhouse gas pollution permits. the cap-and-trade plan is a key part of the state's global warming law enacted in 2006. under its provisions, businesses must cut emissions to a certain level or buy allowances from companies that don't need all of their allowances. the program still has to survive a court challenge. the u.s. air force will change the way it selects officers and instructors who train new recruits. that follows a sexual abuse scandal at lackland air force base near san antonio, texas. an investigation found 23 instructors allegedly abused at least 48 female recruits. so far, five people have been convicted on charges ranging from adultery to rape. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we turn back to one of the topics raised in president obama's news conference today, the investigation of former c.i.a. director david petraeus. the former military leader's resignation after admitting to an extramarital affair raises questions about the standard
and in the midst of the california wildfires six years ago, for the first time you saw private firefighters showing up at people's homes, spraying them with fire retardant, so when the fire came this mansion would be standing and the next one might burn to the ground. this is extraordinary because we would tend to think of fire fighting, this is definitely a public good and definitely something that people get equally and now we're finding that even -- there's even a two-tiering of protection from wildfires. >> if there was even a short-lived airline in florida, i read about, that offered five-star evacuation service in the events of hurricane. >> yea, after hurricane katrina a company in florida saw a market opportunity and they decided to offer a charter airline that would turn your hurricane into a luxury vacation. that was actually the slogan. they would let you know a hurricane was headed to your area. they would pick you up in a limousine and drive you to the airport and they would make you five-star hotel reservations at the destination of your choice. why does a hurricane have to be bad new
in three key areas. they were in illinois, california, and new england. those are all places where the president did very well. i think that even though going into election day those were close races, but the undecideds were president obama voters. they also broke for the democratic congressional candidate. >> woodruff: in a way there was maybe coat tail as part of the president's race. >> in states where they weren't swing states the races were places where the president did well. i think democratic candidates benefited. >> woodruff: as you look at the country overall, nathan, is there a trend, is there a story to be told about who did a better job, which party or the other did a better job of targeting these races? >> i think some of it is geographic. you had democrats strengthening and dem trattic states and democratic regions such as new england where there's no longer, there's no house republicans in new england right now. >> woodruff: at all. at all. there's senator snow who is kind of holding down the fort there but... then you saw republicans strengthening their grip on the
of typical california groups where everybody's, you know, sharing their deep experiences. and the leader of the group asked me -- >> a therapy group? a therapy -- >> a therapy group, yeah. >> were you in therapy? >> well, it wasn't therapy. it was, you know, we were a bunch of hippies. i mean, you know, we were sort of, you know, sharing our deep experiences. you know, i mean, god, it's hard to remember the '70s. but that was part of it. and my wife had said, you know, "this is a good thing. we should go to one of these things." and so i was there. i'm game, you know. and one of the group leaders asked me to imagine telling the mother and sister of somebody i'd killed that i was sorry. >> you mean going to the vietnamese family and saying -- >> yeah. so i started to imagine that. and i fell apart. i mean, i fell apart. i started sobbing. i started -- i mean, i cried for three days. i couldn't stop crying for three days. and then i got it under control. and i shoved it back down again. and it wasn't until that night that this specific guy came back again. and you can only shove it down so
with picket lines forming outside walmart stores from california to maryland. a group called our walmart organized the walk-off in 100 cities. >> we're asking for living wages, we're asking for decent scheduling. they're not things that are hard. i mean, we want health care. they're the most richest retailer in the world. >> sreenivasan: walmart executives said these protestors do not represent the 1.3 million employees who work at the company. >> sreenivasan: the stock market also got a boost from black friday, rising sharply on early reports of strong retail sales. on a shortened day of trading, the dow jones industrial average gained more than 172 points to close at 13,009. the nasdaq rose 40 points to close above 2,966. for the week, the dow gained 3.4%; the nasdaq rose nearly 4%. a european union summit in brussels broke up today without any agreement on a long-term budget. the 27-nation bloc was trying to reach consensus on a more than trillion-dollar long-term spending plan. it primarily funds farming and programs to spur growth in less- developed nations. some members backed a bu
Search Results 0 to 27 of about 28 (some duplicates have been removed)

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